What can you do if you have scary thoughts about your baby?

What can you do if you have scary thoughts about your baby?

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Did you know…

Between 70 – 100% of mums with babies will have frightening thoughts about something bad happening to their baby?¹²

This is a really high number, but it’s something that people don’t talk about. These thoughts can involve accidental harm (such as worrying about SIDS, your baby getting sick, or leaving them somewhere) or intentional harm (like seeing yourself shake or hit your baby).

𝐖𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐟 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐝𝐨𝐧’𝐭 𝐭𝐚𝐥𝐤 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐬?

You wind up alone with your thoughts and distress- not an ideal start to enjoying life with your baby.

 

𝐖𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐩𝐞𝐧𝐬 𝐢𝐟 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐝𝐨 𝐭𝐚𝐥𝐤 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐬?

Sometimes other people just won’t understand. You might feel judged or dismissed. You may even hear comments like:

  • ‘What’s wrong with you?’
  • ‘Why would you think this way?’
  • ‘Are you actually going to hurt the baby?’
  • ‘Just don’t think about it’
  • ‘Focus on the positives’

And more…

 

But sometimes, when you dare to open up, you can find the right person who gives you understanding- so you feel less alone. Maybe they can even help point you in the right direction. But, for many women, this experience is few and far between.

 

𝐈’𝐝 𝐥𝐨𝐯𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐡𝐞𝐥𝐩 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐞 𝐬𝐜𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐬.

Given how many women can experience worrying thoughts about their babies, it’s time to start a helpful conversation. One that gives you the understanding you need, as well as the skills to manage.

You don’t have to start your baby’s life by being distressed by what’s happening inside your mind. This is exactly why I created ‘Let’s Talk About Scary Thoughts After Birth… And How to Survive Them’. You’ll learn everything you need to know about scary thoughts, including how to manage them and reduce their frequency. 𝐈𝐭’𝐬 𝐚𝐯𝐚𝐢𝐥𝐚𝐛𝐥𝐞 𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞.

 

And here’s the best part- 𝐢𝐭’𝐬 𝐣𝐮𝐬𝐭 $𝟐𝟐. I really wanted this course to be accessible to any mum, anywhere, with any financial position.

 

Have hope mama- help is on the way, if you decide this is for you.

 

 

Kind wishes,

 

Emma

 


References

  1. Brok, E. C., Lok, P., Oosterbaan, D.B. … van Eijndhoven, P. F. (2017). Infant-Related Intrusive Thoughts of Harm in the Postpartum Period: A Critical Review. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 78, e913-e923. DOI: 10.4088/JCP.16r11083

 

  1. Fairbrother, N., & Woody, S.R. (2008). New mothers’ thoughts of harm related to the newborn. Archives of Women’s Mental Health, 11, 221-229. DOI: 10.1007/s00737-008-0016-7
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